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New York Times: A Bookworm’s Travel Plan

In The New York Times of December 6, 2016, Jennifer Moses writes about the joys of visiting bookstores while traveling. She traces her bookloving pasttime to a time when she lived in Glasgow and discovered Caledonia Books — and an author of particular interest and influence:

Finally, I busted out my umbrella, took to the streets and stumbled into a time warp consisting of dust and books. Piles of them. Whole mountain ranges of them. It was a veritable temple devoted to the past two or three centuries of first-rate, secondhand and antiquarian books: the Brontë sisters, the Mitford sisters, George Eliot, James Joyce, James Jones, Henry James.

And then I saw it: a small city, built entirely of the novels of Anthony Trollope, an author I’d never before taken up, though I distinctly remember my mother’s dear friend Jessica saying something like: “At a certain point past youth, if you don’t discover Trollope, there’s basically nothing to live for.” Trollope? You mean that bearded and bespectacled Victorian word-factory with his hemming and hawing and endlessly long sentences? I’d rather be stuck on an elevator. But there it was, beckoning me: “The Eustace Diamonds,” crumbling and stained. As if it were an abandoned dog, I couldn’t resist.

I walked home with it tucked under my arm, this massive Victorian book in this massive Victorian town. And for the rest of the year, whenever I felt low, or just needed to be in a place where the dust itself hinted of adventures, I’d be back at the shop, with its big front windows crammed with (what else?) books and the wonderful smell of dusty old books.

(Read more.)


Posted on: December 10th, 2016 by Douglas Gerlach


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